Interactive Whiteboards in Classrooms

Interactive whiteboards can be seen almost in every classroom. But why do some teachers use them and others only use it as a visual aid?

Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs) encourage dialogic teaching and not only students learning from each other but teachers and students building on each others’ ideas (Mercer, Hennessy, & Warwick, 2010). The IWBs can assist teachers in carrying out pedagogic intentions such as scaffold learning (Mercer, Hennessy, & Warwick, 2010) which can also lead to collaborative learning,develop a learning community, support provisionality of students’ evolving ideas etc (Mercer, Hennessy, & Warwick, 2010).

There are also some challenges that comes with the use of IWBs to enhance classroom learning. Teacher’s attitude towards using this classroom hardware is definitely a factor. Glover and Miller reports three different attitudes. Firstly, teachers who are enthusiatic and ready to embrace interactive learning styles (Glover & Miller, 2006). Secondly, teachers who lacks confidence to change approaches therefore limiting the development of interactive teaching (Glover & Miller, 2006). Finally, interactive whiteboards are only used as visual aids by teachers with little shift from transmissive teaching styles (Glover & Miller, 2006).

 

References

Mercer, N., Hennessy, S., & Warwick, P. (2010). Using interactive whiteboards to orchestrate classroom dialogue. Taylor & Francis Online. Retrieved 15 March 2017, from http://www-tandfonline-com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/doi/full/10.1080/1475939X.2010.491230?scroll=top&needAccess=true

Glover, D. & Miller, D. (2006). Running with technology: the pedagogic impact of the large-scale introduction of interactive whiteboards in one secondary school. Taylor & Francis Online. Retrieved 15 March 2017, from http://www-tandfonline-com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/doi/abs/10.1080/14759390100200115

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s